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Official Obituary of: Bruce Ralph Bumpus 12/30/2018

Bruce Ralph Bumpus 12/30/2018

PLAINVILLE – Bruce Ralph Bumpus, 71, of Plainville passed away Sunday, December 30, 2018 at Sturdy Memorial Hospital after a battle with cancer.  He was the loving husband of Roberta (Rowell) Bumpus for over 46 years.

Born December 17, 1947 in Attleboro, he was a son of the late Paul W., Sr. and Ruth E. (Skinner) Bumpus.

Bruce lived all his life in Attleboro Falls before moving to Plainville 42 years ago.

He was a 1966 graduate of North Attleboro High School and earned a certificate in Applied Electronics from Franklin Institute in Boston.  He began his career at Hanson Engineering in North Attleboro and went on to work for Poly Tec-Electro Bond in Attleboro where he worked as an engineer for over fifty years designing, building and repairing semi-automatic high resistance welding machines.

Bruce was extremely active in Plainville town politics and with the town’s  cable access television channel.  He filmed selectmen’s meetings, town meetings and various other events in Plainville for close to 40 years and headed the cable television committee.  He was also a member of the town Centennial Committee and organized the classic car show for the Plainville Lions Club annual Fall Festival.

He was chairman of Disaster Services for the American Red Cross Northern Bristol/Norfolk chapter in North Attleboro and a member of the South Attleboro Rescue Squad.  Bruce also served as the Emergency Management Director for the Town of Plainville for over 5 years.  He was also one of the founding members of Tri-boro REACT which was one of the charter members of the REACT organization and served to provide communications support for community events and public safety agencies prior to the age of public safety communications systems. Bruce also volunteered for the B.A.A. (Boston Athletic Association) at the Boston Marathon for over 25 years providing both medical and communications support. 

Bruce was an avid train and fire-engine buff and an Amateur (Ham) Radio Operator and was a member of the Sturdy Memorial Hospital Amateur Radio Club.  Bruce was also a longtime member of the Central Congregational Church in Attleboro Falls where he served on various boards and committees.

In addition to his wife, he is survived by his son Scott P. Bumpus of West Sand Lake, NY; a grandson Zachary S. Bumpus; two brothers: Paul W. Bumpus, Jr. and wife Theresa of Ottawa Lake, Michigan and Gary M. Bumpus and wife Sheila of Attleboro; and two nieces: Karen L. Bumpus-Host of Plainville and Kendra L. Bumpus of Phoenix, Arizona.

Visiting hours will be held on Thursday, January 3 from 3-7 p.m. at the Sperry & McHoul Funeral Home, 15 Grove Street, North Attleboro.  A funeral service will be held at Central Congregational Church, 115 Commonwealth Avenue, Attleboro Falls on Friday, January 4 at 11 a.m.  Burial will be private at Plainville Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to either Lion’s Club International for eye research, 300 West 22nd Street, Oak Brook, IL 60523 or to the Central Congregational Church Memorial Gift Fund, 115 Commonwealth Avenue, Attleboro Falls, MA 02763. 

 

  • Comment (4)
  • I was on the South Attleboro Rescue Squad with Bruce and was associated with him when I was on the Attleboro Civil Defense Communication Squad,Bruce was with REACT. Thoughts and prayers to the Bruce’s family.

  • Bruce and I became friends coming out of high school.  Although we did not go to school together, we became fast friends via CB and REACT, as well as Civil Defense.  We quickly became a “dynamic duo”.  Bruce could not see well enough to drive, so I became the eyes and wheels of the operation and he was clearly the brains and ethics of the team.  We finished many nights together at the State Line Diner, enjoyed taking training together, and took trips to New Hampshire and Maine.  I was a frequent flyer on Birchwood Drive in the Falls, and Bruce on Pine Street in Attleboro.  In many ways, Bruce became the brother that I never had.  We were often in touch while I was in the service and Bruce had a new “driver” and partner, someone called Roberta.  He would often walk from work on County Street and have lunch with my Mom…very often a ham sandwich as I remember it.  

    Time went by, and things changed as they always do.  Roberta became a permanent partner, as did Irene for me.  And then, there was a breakthrough in sight assistance and Bruce was able to obtain special driving lenses.  It opened a whole new world of mobility for him, and a whole new definition of fear for Roberta, Irene, and me when he drove us all to the summit of Mount Washington.   When the kids came along, Bruce and Roberta became Godparents for our two youngest sons.  We spent many nights at either our place or theirs playing cards, we sharing a deluge of special events. When we moved to Maine the calls and time together became all the more valued.

    To say that Bruce was fond of anything to do with trains and collecting “special stuff” would be an understatement.  Last year we shared time at the mill museum in Lowell…if it was mechanical, it interested him greatly.  He continued through the years to do what he found challenging and satisfying for work…and he was really good at his profession.  He also found ways to use his talents to contribute meaningfully to his community…Bruce was a “giver” far more than a “taker”.

    You will be missed. Thanks for being such a great friend.

  • Sorry for your loss. I was associated with Bruce through the South Attleboro Rescue and Attleboro Civil Defense/Emergency Management. I worked his Paul.

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4 Responses

  1. Sorry for your loss. I was associated with Bruce through the South Attleboro Rescue and Attleboro Civil Defense/Emergency Management. I worked his Paul.

  2. Bruce and I became friends coming out of high school.  Although we did not go to school together, we became fast friends via CB and REACT, as well as Civil Defense.  We quickly became a “dynamic duo”.  Bruce could not see well enough to drive, so I became the eyes and wheels of the operation and he was clearly the brains and ethics of the team.  We finished many nights together at the State Line Diner, enjoyed taking training together, and took trips to New Hampshire and Maine.  I was a frequent flyer on Birchwood Drive in the Falls, and Bruce on Pine Street in Attleboro.  In many ways, Bruce became the brother that I never had.  We were often in touch while I was in the service and Bruce had a new “driver” and partner, someone called Roberta.  He would often walk from work on County Street and have lunch with my Mom…very often a ham sandwich as I remember it.  

    Time went by, and things changed as they always do.  Roberta became a permanent partner, as did Irene for me.  And then, there was a breakthrough in sight assistance and Bruce was able to obtain special driving lenses.  It opened a whole new world of mobility for him, and a whole new definition of fear for Roberta, Irene, and me when he drove us all to the summit of Mount Washington.   When the kids came along, Bruce and Roberta became Godparents for our two youngest sons.  We spent many nights at either our place or theirs playing cards, we sharing a deluge of special events. When we moved to Maine the calls and time together became all the more valued.

    To say that Bruce was fond of anything to do with trains and collecting “special stuff” would be an understatement.  Last year we shared time at the mill museum in Lowell…if it was mechanical, it interested him greatly.  He continued through the years to do what he found challenging and satisfying for work…and he was really good at his profession.  He also found ways to use his talents to contribute meaningfully to his community…Bruce was a “giver” far more than a “taker”.

    You will be missed. Thanks for being such a great friend.

  3. I was on the South Attleboro Rescue Squad with Bruce and was associated with him when I was on the Attleboro Civil Defense Communication Squad,Bruce was with REACT. Thoughts and prayers to the Bruce’s family.

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